Loading..... Please wait
Report

Bookmarks

 
 
Dowry: Whose culture is it? PDF Print E-mail
(7 Votes)
Written by ADministrator   
Monday, 27 October 2008 09:23

Dowry culture was never an Indian culture... Who brought it here?

A dowry (also known as trousseau) is the money, goods, or estate that a woman brings to her husband in marriage.

The opposite direction, property given to the bride by the groom, is called dower or mahr. Normally the bride would be entitled to her dowry in event of her widowhood, prior to the evolution of her dower rights; so common was this that the terms “dowry” and “dower” are sometimes confused.

The dowry should not be confused with a bride price, money or goods paid by the prospective groom to the bride’s parents in exchange for her hand in marriage.

In Homeric times, the usual Greek practice was to give a brideprice, and dowries were also exchanged in the later classical time (5th century BC). Ancient Romans also practiced dowry, though Tacitus notes that the Germanic tribes practiced the reverse custom of the dower.

Read more...